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She had just successfully completed a BIGG project. She wasn’t sure how she would do. She did spectacularly. She felt even more spectacular!

About a year ago, she was offered the opportunity to chair a similar project. She was tentative. She wasn’t sure she could handle it.

She expressed her concerns to her boss. He told her not to worry about it. One of her co-workers chaired it.

But now she had successfully tackled a project of the same size and scope.

Wow, did it feel good!

Until she talked with her boss.

Listen to this post! Click a player to hear George & Mary-Lynn on The BIGG Success Show.

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Her boss didn’t say a word. No pat on the back. No good job. No anything.

She called it to his attention. It didn’t even seem like he heard her. He had other things on his mind.

She left his office discouraged. Understandably so. So what should she do? Here’s what we told her.

Resist the urge to personalize it

As cliché as it may sound, it’s not you; it’s him.

You did your job. He didn’t do his.

You capitalized on the opportunity. He missed the opportunity.

So don’t take it personally. Don’t allow yourself to think that he doesn’t like YOU. Or that he doesn’t have time for YOU.

This speculation will only make you more tentative in your future dealings with him. It almost becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

So assume he treated you no differently than he would anyone else.

Call it to his attention

Don’t do this blatantly. But make sure you find a way to bring it up to him again.

Ideally, in writing – whether in the form of an e-mail or a printed document.

Look for spin-off successes from the project. Then let him know about it.

You may say something like, “We just did X thanks to the successful completion of the Y project on time and on budget. As the project chair, I’m delighted to see the continued impact this project is making in our company.”

By putting it in writing, you’ll have documentation at your next review. It also isn’t as easy to glance over. So it may be the prod he needs to give you the recognition you deserve.

Get your kicks elsewhere

It may just be that your boss isn’t the kind of person who ever gives out any recognition anywhere. You may need to get it somewhere else.

Do you have a blog?
Could you do a case study?
Would anyone in your industry be interested in learning how you did it?
Could you do a presentation about it at an industry conference?

It may not be the project itself. It may be how you managed it. It may be some unique challenge you overcame.

Find a reason to call attention to yourself. Sometimes, if you want it done, you just have to do it yourself. And it leads to BIGG success!

What’s your advice for getting the recognition you deserve?

Direct link to The Bigg Success Show audio file | podcast:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/biggsuccess/00758-120111.mp3

Image in this post from stock.xchng